Autumn statement response

Sally Dicketts, Group Chief Executive of Activate Learning

Follow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

The Chancellor has today announced that funding for further education colleges will be protected in cash terms.

This comes as a huge relief for the sector, which was braced for further cuts to the adult skills budget and funding for 16-19 year olds.

At the same time the Chancellor has announced that 19 year olds will be able to access further education loans. This will enable this age group to access training that will make a real impact on their future career and earning potential.

As always, the devil will be in the detail, but on the face of today’s announcement it appears that the campaigning done by colleges up and down the country has paid off.

The situation for many further education colleges is already extremely tough, with funding having reduced by 22 per cent over the last five years. Over the same period funding for schools and universities has grown.

Colleges provide a vital service to the local community, developing the skilled workforce required to meet employment needs and drive growth.

We need the government to recognise the value of this incredibly resourceful sector, and today’s announcement provides some signs that this is beginning.

Will government grants develop grit in our young people?

Blog by Sally Dicketts, Chief Executive of Activate Learning. Follow Sally on twitter.

What makes some people give up at the first hurdle while others try, try and try again?

overcoming hurdles
Grit, resilience, perseverance – whatever you call it, most would agree that it’s an important trait and something we should be doing more to develop in our young people.

It has now attracted government backing, in the shape of a £5m character grants scheme designed to produce a nation of “resilient, confident young people…ready to lead tomorrow’s Britain”.

As part of the scheme announced by Nicky Morgan this week, premiership rugby coaches will work with pupils in secondary schools to instil the sport’s values in the classroom. This will include learning how to bounce back from setbacks, how to show integrity in victory and defeat and to respect others.

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Surviving revision: tips for success

As we head towards June, it’s that time of the year when thousands of students across the country are getting ready for their exams.

If late night cramming, teenage nerves and too much coffee all sound familiar to you, chances are your son or daughter is one of them.

 

Exam

Want to give them a helping hand, but not sure how? Simply take two minutes off whatever you are doing now to learn how revising the Activate Learning way can make a big difference to their results:
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Should pensioners foot the bill to give young people a chance?

young-and-old

By Sally Dicketts, Chief Executive of Activate Learning @sallydicketts

We keep hearing that the old have plundered the wealth of the young. Significant increases in life expectancy mean that Britain’s over-65s outnumber those under the age of 16 for the first time. The Institute of Economic Affairs recently warned that the government will need to cut spending by more than a quarter or impose significant tax hikes to fund future pension and social care obligations.

At the same time we hear that social mobility and parity of esteem is essential if we are to address disadvantage and provide today’s young people with the same opportunities as our wealthy baby boomers.

The reality is that there is only ever going to be a finite amount of money and competing demands. But I would suggest that the answer lies not in taking money from our pensioners, but in achieving greater equity in funding for education.

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Social mobility undermined by spending plans

This week David Cameron pledged to protect per-pupil funding for five to 16 year-olds if the Conservatives are re-elected in May.

The announcement means that post-16 education remains unprotected from potential cuts – the only section of education to be left in such a vulnerable position.

We often talk about the importance of social mobility in our society. I believe that further education offers the greatest opportunities for social mobility. It equips school leavers with the skills and qualifications required for successful careers and enables adults to access higher education or retrain in light of changing circumstances.

However the funding consistently fails to measure up.

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Campaign puts £88bn value on soft skills

A campaign launched this week suggests that so called soft skills need to be taken much more seriously as factors for determining business success.

The term soft skills is commonly used and the terminology almost seems to place a value judgement on the attributes in question. But they can be generally defined as those skills that are difficult to measure. While it is relatively easy to test someone’s English language and maths skills, measuring initiative, good personal interaction and effective team working is much harder to do.

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