Next steps after Results Day

It’s not easy being a parent – arguably the most important job in the world, and it comes with no instructions manual!

If your son or daughter is getting their GCSE or A-levels results this summer, you’ll be keen to support them as best as you can. This means you may find yourself having important conversations about their future.

We know opening the envelope with their results can be an anxious moment for many young people, with their future career aspirations dependant on their grades. We also know that on occasion their results may not be what they expected.

At Activate Learning, we support every young person to find an exciting career pathway in an industry that they’ll love.

If you want to help your child continue their career pathway, whatever their results, good careers advice and guidance is key. Why not come along to our free advice events this summer, to get dedicated careers advice, find out about sources of potential financial support and more.

The sessions are taking place at Banbury, Oxford and Reading, on:

• Thursday 13 August, 12-4pm
• Thursday 20 August, 10am-6pm
• Friday 21 August, 10am-4pm

Can’t make any of these dates? Why not come and see us later this month? We are open Monday to Friday, and will be open until later on Tuesdays and Thursdays until late September.

If ‘top girls’ opt for jobs over degrees, what can schools do to prepare them?

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

girls school blog pic

The headmistress of one of Britain’s best-performing schools predicts that in future more of the brightest schoolgirls will favour employment over university when they turn 18.

In an interview with The Sunday Times, Clarissa Farr, headmistress of St Paul’s Girls’ School in London, suggested that it is becoming “acceptable for bright students not to go to university” and that heading straight into employment could be a “more exciting and faster route to the top”.

Her comments come at a time when more and more people are questioning the value for money of a university degree. With tuition fees of £9,000 a year, coupled with accommodation and other living costs, the average graduate will emerge from their education with up to £40,000 of debt.

Quite rightly students – and their parents – will want to ensure that university study will significantly enhance employment and long-term career prospects.

Cost however is clearly not the only driver for this shift in thinking amongst the upper echelons of Britain’s private schooling, where annual fees are around £23,500 a year.

Slowly, but surely, a paradigm shift is emerging. Big name employers, frustrated with the well-publicised skills gap between education and employment, are recognising the value of nurturing raw talent and shaping the technical and soft skills that they require in their employees.

Continue reading “If ‘top girls’ opt for jobs over degrees, what can schools do to prepare them?”

What next? Helping your young person at a career crossroads

Is your son or daughter in Years 9, 10 or 11 and undecided about their future? Sometimes the most exciting things may happen unexpectedly, but it’s also good to have a plan. Guide your son or daughter to the right career track, because their future starts today.

Here at Activate Learning we want to give you a helping hand, so you can better understand the options out there and how to support your teenager.

Backpack-guy

Continue reading “What next? Helping your young person at a career crossroads”

Surviving revision: tips for success

As we head towards June, it’s that time of the year when thousands of students across the country are getting ready for their exams.

If late night cramming, teenage nerves and too much coffee all sound familiar to you, chances are your son or daughter is one of them.

 

Exam

Want to give them a helping hand, but not sure how? Simply take two minutes off whatever you are doing now to learn how revising the Activate Learning way can make a big difference to their results:
Continue reading “Surviving revision: tips for success”