Autumn statement response

Sally Dicketts, Group Chief Executive of Activate Learning

Follow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

The Chancellor has today announced that funding for further education colleges will be protected in cash terms.

This comes as a huge relief for the sector, which was braced for further cuts to the adult skills budget and funding for 16-19 year olds.

At the same time the Chancellor has announced that 19 year olds will be able to access further education loans. This will enable this age group to access training that will make a real impact on their future career and earning potential.

As always, the devil will be in the detail, but on the face of today’s announcement it appears that the campaigning done by colleges up and down the country has paid off.

The situation for many further education colleges is already extremely tough, with funding having reduced by 22 per cent over the last five years. Over the same period funding for schools and universities has grown.

Colleges provide a vital service to the local community, developing the skilled workforce required to meet employment needs and drive growth.

We need the government to recognise the value of this incredibly resourceful sector, and today’s announcement provides some signs that this is beginning.

Our education model is rated by everyone except us

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

The academic year draws to a close amidst a backdrop of uncertainty over the future of further education.

In a recent speech to the Association of Employment and Learning Providers, Skills Minister Nick Boles questioned whether the general further education model has a future at all. As the government seeks to reduce the national deficit, what Mr Boles referred to as the ‘unproductive parts of the further education sector’ will come under scrutiny.

Today’s budget will reveal how required savings of £900m to the BIS and DfE budgets will fall on FE.

Britain’s vocational education system is under-funded and under-valued and yet internationally it remains a highly prized commodity.

Continue reading “Our education model is rated by everyone except us”

The writing’s on the wall for adult learning

Sally Dicketts CBE is Chief Executive of Activate Learning

Follow Sally on Twitter @sallydicketts

Writing on the wall

Further education providers across the country finally received the news they’d been dreading last week as the Skills Funding Agency confirmed cuts to the adult skills budget.

The chopping of 24 per cent off funding for adult learners was delivered with a message that things could in fact have been much worse.

SFA chief executive Peter Lauener announced that a last minute deal with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills managed to cushion an even more devastating 32 per cent reduction. Providers who do not deliver apprenticeships, traineeships, nor English and maths will still face this higher level chop and it is difficult to see them surviving at all.

Cuts are cuts, and it is unlikely that anyone in the further education sector is breathing a sigh of relief at a figure of 24 per cent. For a group such as ours, cuts to the adult skills budget will reduce annual income by £1.4m.

Continue reading “The writing’s on the wall for adult learning”

Should pensioners foot the bill to give young people a chance?

young-and-old

By Sally Dicketts, Chief Executive of Activate Learning @sallydicketts

We keep hearing that the old have plundered the wealth of the young. Significant increases in life expectancy mean that Britain’s over-65s outnumber those under the age of 16 for the first time. The Institute of Economic Affairs recently warned that the government will need to cut spending by more than a quarter or impose significant tax hikes to fund future pension and social care obligations.

At the same time we hear that social mobility and parity of esteem is essential if we are to address disadvantage and provide today’s young people with the same opportunities as our wealthy baby boomers.

The reality is that there is only ever going to be a finite amount of money and competing demands. But I would suggest that the answer lies not in taking money from our pensioners, but in achieving greater equity in funding for education.

Continue reading “Should pensioners foot the bill to give young people a chance?”

Are mergers the only answer to swingeing cuts?

There is no denying that times are incredibly tough for the further education sector.

We know that the next three years will bring swingeing cuts to our adult budgets and potential reductions in unit resource for 16 to 19 year olds. Management teams in every college in the country will be exploring the impact of this on their profit and loss account and seeking new ways to generate income and save costs.

Financial pressures are nothing new, but I can’t remember a time when the position has been quite so stark.

Finance, or lack of it, remains one of the key drivers pushing colleges to merge. We have certainly seen a recent flurry of merger activity, a process made simpler by the 2010 Education Act. This comment by the Guardian Further Education Hub provides a useful overview.

But are mergers the only answer to achieving financial stability amidst a sea of cuts? I believe there are alternatives.

Continue reading “Are mergers the only answer to swingeing cuts?”