Autumn statement response

Sally Dicketts, Group Chief Executive of Activate Learning

Follow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

The Chancellor has today announced that funding for further education colleges will be protected in cash terms.

This comes as a huge relief for the sector, which was braced for further cuts to the adult skills budget and funding for 16-19 year olds.

At the same time the Chancellor has announced that 19 year olds will be able to access further education loans. This will enable this age group to access training that will make a real impact on their future career and earning potential.

As always, the devil will be in the detail, but on the face of today’s announcement it appears that the campaigning done by colleges up and down the country has paid off.

The situation for many further education colleges is already extremely tough, with funding having reduced by 22 per cent over the last five years. Over the same period funding for schools and universities has grown.

Colleges provide a vital service to the local community, developing the skilled workforce required to meet employment needs and drive growth.

We need the government to recognise the value of this incredibly resourceful sector, and today’s announcement provides some signs that this is beginning.

Language skills the key to breaking down barriers

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts 

Last week David Cameron set out the government’s Prevent strategy aimed at tackling radicalisation.

The speech highlighted the importance of boosting integration in deprived and isolated communities, including ensuring people learn English.

On the same day the Skills Funding Agency revealed that funding for ESOL plus mandation – a programme to improve the language and literacy skills of job seekers – would be withdrawn.

The cut is part of the £450m savings required by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The links between language and community cohesion are clear.
Continue reading “Language skills the key to breaking down barriers”

Social mobility undermined by spending plans

This week David Cameron pledged to protect per-pupil funding for five to 16 year-olds if the Conservatives are re-elected in May.

The announcement means that post-16 education remains unprotected from potential cuts – the only section of education to be left in such a vulnerable position.

We often talk about the importance of social mobility in our society. I believe that further education offers the greatest opportunities for social mobility. It equips school leavers with the skills and qualifications required for successful careers and enables adults to access higher education or retrain in light of changing circumstances.

However the funding consistently fails to measure up.

Continue reading “Social mobility undermined by spending plans”