What is the future for post-16 education?

Future

Blog by Sally Dicketts, Group Chief Executive, Activate Learning
Follow me on twitter @sallydicketts

There is no shortage of speculation about the future of our education system. This is particularly true for the further education sector, which has been through a turbulent period of late.

Once all the waves of the government’s area-based reviews are complete, it is likely that we will have a much smaller, or at least a more concentrated, vocational provision.

At the same time we await the full details of the first skills white paper to be published in a decade, due out later this month. This is likely to outline around up to 20 new technical professional routes into employment, in a bid to improve the clarity and quality of the vocational offer.

To truly answer questions about what the future holds, I believe that we must first revisit the purpose of education.

My proposition is that education is designed to create able individuals who are curious, challenging and open to learning throughout their lives. These individuals should be equipped to work effectively as part of a team and make a valuable contribution to their organisations and wider society.

If we are to realise this aim, we need to understand how people learn. We must recognise how the brain works, how and why people are motivated to learn and the emotional roadblocks that can derail them.

From these foundations we can create the right environment for effective learning.

This leads me to maintain that two types of post-16 education are as important as they have ever been.

The first is vocational.

Vocational learners do not wish to engage in academic study for the sake of studying itself.  These learners need to see the relevance and purpose of new skills and knowledge through clear connections with their employment context. Vocational learners value employer relationships and practical approaches – the majority of them attend further education colleges.

The second is academic. Academic learners enjoy the rigour and process of learning. They are passionate about their subjects and enjoy acquiring new knowledge without too much concern for its eventual application. These learners tend to follow an A-level route within their local school.

In this context, neither route should be valued above the other, but should simply offer the choice required to ensure that every individual succeeds in realising their potential.

If we accept this – and can convince our government, employers, parents and young people of it – our focus for vocational education then needs to be on raising standards so that our offering becomes truly world class.

By 2022, I believe that vocational further education will need to offer the following in order to be successful:

  • Employer endorsed and co-created curricula that meets the needs of industry and develops relevant skills, behaviours and attitudes in its learners
  • A rigorous framework to recognise and measure professional behaviours, so that learners develop the soft as well as the technical skills demanded by employers
  • Clear career pathways that are used at the point of entry and throughout the learner’s journey, to ensure that they are clear about their future options and the steps required to attain their goals
  • Learning programmes that are time bound, based on individuals’ needs rather than arbitrary funding methodologies
  • A technology rich learning environment, including greater use of virtual reality, to enable learning anytime, anyplace via any device
  • Effective transition support that enables learners to move from education into employment seamlessly
  • A stronger research base that seeks to understand the critical elements behind high performing institutions and share this with others
  • A vocationally relevant means of delivering English and maths education for those who have failed to achieve a grade C by age 16. This should follow a new teaching, learning and assessment methodology without compromising standards
  • A greater focus on destinations, alongside value added and achievement, as true indicators of success

I believe in the capacity of the vocational education sector to achieve this, and am pleased to say that I can see the green shoots of progress already appearing.

English and maths – whose failure is it anyway?

English and maths pic

Blog by Sally Dicketts, Group Chief Executive, Activate Learning
Follow me on twitter @sallydicketts

Ofsted chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw dealt a well-documented body blow to the further education sector last month when he suggested 16 to 19-year-olds would be better off in schools.

When quizzed on his comments to the Education Select Committee, he cited students’ poor performance in GCSE English and maths retakes as a key indicator of the sector’s failings.

Young people who don’t do well in these subjects at 16, rarely improve two years later, he complained.

If schools have failed to prepare these young people for GCSE success in 11 years, why are colleges being criticised for failing to reverse their fortunes in just two?

Last summer the think tank, Policy Exchange, published a report suggesting schools pay a levy to colleges where pupils joined having failed to secure good English and maths grades. The levy would help to ease colleges’ growing budget pressures over what could be seen as “passing the buck” of under-performance.

While many are still reeling from Sir Michael’s comments on further education, engaging in the blame game isn’t really going to help anyone.

No one doubts that English and maths are vital life and employability skills, but for me the question is whether GCSEs are the right indicator of success at all.

If a young person has struggled with English and maths at school, simply asking them to repeat the same exercise for another two years is only likely to reinforce failure.

Our emotions are the biggest barrier to effective learning and our emotional roadblocks are immediately raised when we are presented with a situation we have failed in before.

To break a habit we need to do things differently. We have seen a clear difference in our colleges where English and maths is embedded in the vocational curriculum. A student in hospitality and catering may struggle to see the relevance of writing an essay about their summer holiday, but can appreciate the need to present a clear ingredients list and explain a menu’s nutritional value.

This approach serves to demonstrate the value and impact of English in a vocational context. Students see the relevance and immediately feel motivated to put in the effort required to achieve.

While I absolutely disagree with Sir Michael’s comments about further education, what I hope it provokes is a further debate about how we teach and measure English and maths.

We need to stop being lazy in the way that we make judgements about student attainment, and instead understand the literacy and numeracy skills required for success in employment and life.

Autumn statement response

Sally Dicketts, Group Chief Executive of Activate Learning

Follow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

The Chancellor has today announced that funding for further education colleges will be protected in cash terms.

This comes as a huge relief for the sector, which was braced for further cuts to the adult skills budget and funding for 16-19 year olds.

At the same time the Chancellor has announced that 19 year olds will be able to access further education loans. This will enable this age group to access training that will make a real impact on their future career and earning potential.

As always, the devil will be in the detail, but on the face of today’s announcement it appears that the campaigning done by colleges up and down the country has paid off.

The situation for many further education colleges is already extremely tough, with funding having reduced by 22 per cent over the last five years. Over the same period funding for schools and universities has grown.

Colleges provide a vital service to the local community, developing the skilled workforce required to meet employment needs and drive growth.

We need the government to recognise the value of this incredibly resourceful sector, and today’s announcement provides some signs that this is beginning.

Language skills the key to breaking down barriers

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts 

Last week David Cameron set out the government’s Prevent strategy aimed at tackling radicalisation.

The speech highlighted the importance of boosting integration in deprived and isolated communities, including ensuring people learn English.

On the same day the Skills Funding Agency revealed that funding for ESOL plus mandation – a programme to improve the language and literacy skills of job seekers – would be withdrawn.

The cut is part of the £450m savings required by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The links between language and community cohesion are clear.
Continue reading “Language skills the key to breaking down barriers”

If ‘top girls’ opt for jobs over degrees, what can schools do to prepare them?

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

girls school blog pic

The headmistress of one of Britain’s best-performing schools predicts that in future more of the brightest schoolgirls will favour employment over university when they turn 18.

In an interview with The Sunday Times, Clarissa Farr, headmistress of St Paul’s Girls’ School in London, suggested that it is becoming “acceptable for bright students not to go to university” and that heading straight into employment could be a “more exciting and faster route to the top”.

Her comments come at a time when more and more people are questioning the value for money of a university degree. With tuition fees of £9,000 a year, coupled with accommodation and other living costs, the average graduate will emerge from their education with up to £40,000 of debt.

Quite rightly students – and their parents – will want to ensure that university study will significantly enhance employment and long-term career prospects.

Cost however is clearly not the only driver for this shift in thinking amongst the upper echelons of Britain’s private schooling, where annual fees are around £23,500 a year.

Slowly, but surely, a paradigm shift is emerging. Big name employers, frustrated with the well-publicised skills gap between education and employment, are recognising the value of nurturing raw talent and shaping the technical and soft skills that they require in their employees.

Continue reading “If ‘top girls’ opt for jobs over degrees, what can schools do to prepare them?”

If FE colleges are so dangerous, why send the most vulnerable?

A version of the following blog, by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts, appeared in TES on 12 June.

Folllow Sally on twitter @salldicketts

Further education has an image problem. That statement will come as no surprise to anyone working in the sector.

While many have no understanding of it at all, others perceive it to be a risky option.

We are used to responding to parents’ concerns about how their child will fare – leaving the relative safety of school for a semi-urban college campus where their son or daughter will face greater freedoms, follow a more flexible timetable and potentially mix with a more diverse student body.

Continue reading “If FE colleges are so dangerous, why send the most vulnerable?”

When it comes to education, is the customer really king?

Sally Dicketts CBE is Group Chief Executive of Activate Learning

Follow Sally on Twitter @sallydicketts

English and maths GCSE

How many educators think about their students as customers?

If we did, would it change the way we deliver our products and services?

In the last few weeks English and maths have been hitting the headlines again.

A survey of business leaders by the Education and Training Foundation revealed that three-quarters of employers believe action is needed to improve English and maths skills.

Some complained that young recruits use text speak rather than full sentences, others said that poor spelling and communication skills are damaging their business.

Meanwhile a poll of 1,000 parents by ComRes for Teach First and Barclays revealed that parents value maths skills for their children, but struggle themselves. Two in five parents need to use their phone calculator to work out sums and a third feel anxious about supporting their child with homework.

Since September 2013, any young person who fails to get a grade C in GCSE English or maths must continue to study the subject until the age of 18.

As an education provider we want to attract and delight our customers. Yet the reality is that our customers don’t want to re-take failed GCSE English and maths exams.

Continue reading “When it comes to education, is the customer really king?”

The writing’s on the wall for adult learning

Sally Dicketts CBE is Chief Executive of Activate Learning

Follow Sally on Twitter @sallydicketts

Writing on the wall

Further education providers across the country finally received the news they’d been dreading last week as the Skills Funding Agency confirmed cuts to the adult skills budget.

The chopping of 24 per cent off funding for adult learners was delivered with a message that things could in fact have been much worse.

SFA chief executive Peter Lauener announced that a last minute deal with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills managed to cushion an even more devastating 32 per cent reduction. Providers who do not deliver apprenticeships, traineeships, nor English and maths will still face this higher level chop and it is difficult to see them surviving at all.

Cuts are cuts, and it is unlikely that anyone in the further education sector is breathing a sigh of relief at a figure of 24 per cent. For a group such as ours, cuts to the adult skills budget will reduce annual income by £1.4m.

Continue reading “The writing’s on the wall for adult learning”

Levelling the field in preparing for work

stock-footage-young-person-attending-a-business-interview

At a college advisory board meeting this week the message from employers was a familiar one.

When it comes to job interviews, young people just aren’t prepared.

The typical candidate was described as having done little or no research on the company or role, inappropriately dressed and lacking the desired language, behaviour or attitude.

Not a ringing endorsement for today’s young people.

For our born digital generation the prospect of a 20 minute interview focused on a single activity, involving conversation and eye contact, can feel like an alien concept. More typically our young people are wired to mobile devices, used to texting while talking or engaging in multiple social media conversations without human contact.

It raises the age old question of work readiness and how we get our young people to meet the expectations of employers and the demands of the workplace.

Continue reading “Levelling the field in preparing for work”

Should pensioners foot the bill to give young people a chance?

young-and-old

By Sally Dicketts, Chief Executive of Activate Learning @sallydicketts

We keep hearing that the old have plundered the wealth of the young. Significant increases in life expectancy mean that Britain’s over-65s outnumber those under the age of 16 for the first time. The Institute of Economic Affairs recently warned that the government will need to cut spending by more than a quarter or impose significant tax hikes to fund future pension and social care obligations.

At the same time we hear that social mobility and parity of esteem is essential if we are to address disadvantage and provide today’s young people with the same opportunities as our wealthy baby boomers.

The reality is that there is only ever going to be a finite amount of money and competing demands. But I would suggest that the answer lies not in taking money from our pensioners, but in achieving greater equity in funding for education.

Continue reading “Should pensioners foot the bill to give young people a chance?”