Language skills the key to breaking down barriers

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts 

Last week David Cameron set out the government’s Prevent strategy aimed at tackling radicalisation.

The speech highlighted the importance of boosting integration in deprived and isolated communities, including ensuring people learn English.

On the same day the Skills Funding Agency revealed that funding for ESOL plus mandation – a programme to improve the language and literacy skills of job seekers – would be withdrawn.

The cut is part of the £450m savings required by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The links between language and community cohesion are clear.
Continue reading “Language skills the key to breaking down barriers”

Will the post-16 education review ‘fix the foundations’?

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

Foundations

Last week the government released the first details of its national review of post-16 education.

The 10-page report sets out a plan for “fewer, more resilient and efficient providers” which could include new Institutes of Technology and National Colleges providing training in industry specialisms.

The proposals stem the Government’s productivity plan – Fixing the Foundations – which aims to create a more prosperous and productive Britain.

While the detail on such sweeping reforms is scant at this early stage, we know that the vision will be achieved via a national programme of area-based reviews, starting in September.

Area-based reviews are not new to the sector, but they haven’t before been driven through with such an imperative for colleges to collaborate and merge.

Merger is part of our history at Activate Learning, where three colleges are now part of one group with centralised support services.

However, in the current climate I would question whether merger is always the best route for colleges needing to improve effectiveness and financial stability. Continue reading “Will the post-16 education review ‘fix the foundations’?”

If ‘top girls’ opt for jobs over degrees, what can schools do to prepare them?

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

girls school blog pic

The headmistress of one of Britain’s best-performing schools predicts that in future more of the brightest schoolgirls will favour employment over university when they turn 18.

In an interview with The Sunday Times, Clarissa Farr, headmistress of St Paul’s Girls’ School in London, suggested that it is becoming “acceptable for bright students not to go to university” and that heading straight into employment could be a “more exciting and faster route to the top”.

Her comments come at a time when more and more people are questioning the value for money of a university degree. With tuition fees of £9,000 a year, coupled with accommodation and other living costs, the average graduate will emerge from their education with up to £40,000 of debt.

Quite rightly students – and their parents – will want to ensure that university study will significantly enhance employment and long-term career prospects.

Cost however is clearly not the only driver for this shift in thinking amongst the upper echelons of Britain’s private schooling, where annual fees are around £23,500 a year.

Slowly, but surely, a paradigm shift is emerging. Big name employers, frustrated with the well-publicised skills gap between education and employment, are recognising the value of nurturing raw talent and shaping the technical and soft skills that they require in their employees.

Continue reading “If ‘top girls’ opt for jobs over degrees, what can schools do to prepare them?”

Our education model is rated by everyone except us

Blog by Activate Learning Group Chief Executive Sally Dicketts.
Folllow Sally on twitter @sallydicketts

The academic year draws to a close amidst a backdrop of uncertainty over the future of further education.

In a recent speech to the Association of Employment and Learning Providers, Skills Minister Nick Boles questioned whether the general further education model has a future at all. As the government seeks to reduce the national deficit, what Mr Boles referred to as the ‘unproductive parts of the further education sector’ will come under scrutiny.

Today’s budget will reveal how required savings of £900m to the BIS and DfE budgets will fall on FE.

Britain’s vocational education system is under-funded and under-valued and yet internationally it remains a highly prized commodity.

Continue reading “Our education model is rated by everyone except us”