Are mergers the only answer to swingeing cuts?

There is no denying that times are incredibly tough for the further education sector.

We know that the next three years will bring swingeing cuts to our adult budgets and potential reductions in unit resource for 16 to 19 year olds. Management teams in every college in the country will be exploring the impact of this on their profit and loss account and seeking new ways to generate income and save costs.

Financial pressures are nothing new, but I can’t remember a time when the position has been quite so stark.

Finance, or lack of it, remains one of the key drivers pushing colleges to merge. We have certainly seen a recent flurry of merger activity, a process made simpler by the 2010 Education Act. This comment by the Guardian Further Education Hub provides a useful overview.

But are mergers the only answer to achieving financial stability amidst a sea of cuts? I believe there are alternatives.

Continue reading “Are mergers the only answer to swingeing cuts?”

Social mobility undermined by spending plans

This week David Cameron pledged to protect per-pupil funding for five to 16 year-olds if the Conservatives are re-elected in May.

The announcement means that post-16 education remains unprotected from potential cuts – the only section of education to be left in such a vulnerable position.

We often talk about the importance of social mobility in our society. I believe that further education offers the greatest opportunities for social mobility. It equips school leavers with the skills and qualifications required for successful careers and enables adults to access higher education or retrain in light of changing circumstances.

However the funding consistently fails to measure up.

Continue reading “Social mobility undermined by spending plans”